Non-Fiction
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Every Day Acts of Peace

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Monday, March 14, 2011

Tokyo 1989: Sanity Is: Madness of Love, To Never Lose Faith In Love, For Life

Rain falls
so I take my favorite route away from the crowd,
to emerge under Ginza's railway bridge,
where tempura soup stalls stand and noodle tents boil
food for people Velcro-shut-in plastic-bubbles.

Escaping heat
streams upward seeking shelter under lamppost shades.
My eyes glow yellow under lamplight golden beams -
I am a cat watching in the dark the path that rain takes
as it pours onto the heads of tented customers 
who while entering and exiting release fuzzy-tear velcro-noises, 
and misty soup-steam into navy-blue nights.

The bottom of teacups reveal
in the soaked-wet fallen-leaves the alchemy of life.
How to turn concrete into gold, and transform metal from solid to liquid flame.
The mystic qualities of life are not a manipulated fiction but a fact.
Questioning the logic disrupts the balance and imbalance of life
of those desperate to believe our contra-conception of reality and events.

Bullet trains whip by
at the speed of sound tossing my hair wildly upwards, 
in bowing worship to gleaming armored-bodies.
Zeus throws thunderbolts lighting up the under-tracks,
sparking halos to hail the advancing techno-army.
Metal on metal brakes-to-rails create streaming currents of electrical rains –
falling energy-charged droplets that mix with rising vapors of steamed people.

Pure thought as I think of one person, then the many
imagined and pulled straight out of my mind,
to reveal the world of society within myself -
I inspirationally suddenly become alive
with comprehension of sensitivity among insanity,
sanity is: madness of love, to never lose faith in love, for life.

~ Other people's Fingerprints ~
Sometime after 1659 Yamamoto Jocho said;

“One may measure the stature of a person’s dignity
on the basis of external impression.
There is dignity in assiduity and effort.
There is dignity in serenity.
There is dignity in closeness of mouth.
There is dignity in observing proper etiquette.
There is dignity in behaving always with propriety.
There is great dignity too in clenched teeth and flashing eyes.
All these qualities are externally visible.
The most important thing is to concentrate on them at all times
and to be totally sincere in displaying them.”